KARE KARE
Kare Kare is a Filipino stew also known as “peanut butter meat” which supposedly originated from Pampanga, a providence in the Philippines, known as one of the country’s main source for sugar and rice.  
This is one of my favorite Filipino dishes and therefore it was that much more fun to deconstruct and eat!
Ingredients:  Oxtail, peanut butter, bok choy, green beans, egg plant, bagoong.
I boiled the oxtail for about 2 1/2 hours and added peanut butter and green beans.  I let the oxtails marinate for about another 1/2 hour.
Browned in oil, 2 round eggplant slices.
I pulled the meat off of the bones, chopped up the green beans and placed that mix in between the eggplant slices.
Plate dressed with the fresh bok choy, bagoong (pink, fish sauce) and drizzled with melted peanut butter.  FYI bagoong is just as strong as wasabi, in a fishy, salty way…so use just a smidgeon (did I really write “smidgeon?”) for each bite.
I was hesitant about how the fresh bok choy would taste, but it wasn’t bad at all. I should not have added any peanut butter to the meat after I boiled it, because the drizzle across the top was enough, in fact a tad too much.  
This would be a great Amuse Bouche in my book! ;)
A-

KARE KARE

Kare Kare is a Filipino stew also known as “peanut butter meat” which supposedly originated from Pampanga, a providence in the Philippines, known as one of the country’s main source for sugar and rice.  

This is one of my favorite Filipino dishes and therefore it was that much more fun to deconstruct and eat!

Ingredients:  Oxtail, peanut butter, bok choy, green beans, egg plant, bagoong.

  1. I boiled the oxtail for about 2 1/2 hours and added peanut butter and green beans.  I let the oxtails marinate for about another 1/2 hour.
  2. Browned in oil, 2 round eggplant slices.
  3. I pulled the meat off of the bones, chopped up the green beans and placed that mix in between the eggplant slices.
  4. Plate dressed with the fresh bok choy, bagoong (pink, fish sauce) and drizzled with melted peanut butter.  FYI bagoong is just as strong as wasabi, in a fishy, salty way…so use just a smidgeon (did I really write “smidgeon?”) for each bite.

I was hesitant about how the fresh bok choy would taste, but it wasn’t bad at all. I should not have added any peanut butter to the meat after I boiled it, because the drizzle across the top was enough, in fact a tad too much.  

This would be a great Amuse Bouche in my book! ;)

A-

Constructive Deconstruction

Notes

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